Install this theme

dropanchors:

Founder of a free school for slum children Rajesh Kumar Sharma, second from right, and Laxmi Chandra, right, write on black boards, painted on a building wall, at a free school run under a metro bridge in New Delhi, India. At least 30 children living in the nearby slums have been receiving free education from this school for the last three years. via politics-war

artchipel:

Ed Fairburn (UK) - Bartholomew Series. Pencil on original Bartholomew maps of Pembroke (above) and Galloway (below)

Illustrator Ed Fairburn‘s Maps series turns road and subway maps into interesting canvases for his ink and pencil portraits. The artist utilizes the multicolored, patterned surface of each map to serve as an eye-catching attribute that echoes the complex textures found in the human form. Fairburn says, “Emphasis is placed on the ‘fragmented’ texture of the skin, a process which has encouraged my work to evolve from its occupation of plain paper to the potential occupation of other, pre-fragmented or pre-patterned surfaces.” Each winding, converging, and diverging route also bears a striking resemblance to the veins and nerves that make up man. There is a connection between the Earth and mankind reflected in Fairburn’s map portraits that at first is a subtle realization, second to the stunning visual amalgamations.

[more Ed Fairburn | artist found at feel desain]

likeafieldmouse:

Yutaka Sone - Little Manhattan (2011) - 2.5 tons of marble carved into a precise model of Manhattan

hifructosemag:

Trustocorp As seen in Hi-Fructose Vol. 21

razorshapes:

Trustocorp - Cheerful NYC Subway Signs

Gotye. Somebody that I used to know.

Caine’s arcade. Awesome.

thegang:

Artist Mark Bradford is currently showing his work in an awesome show at theSFMOMA.
Bradford is an abstract artist who crafts abstract paintings from fragments of the urban environment — permanent-wave end papers (beauty parlor realness!), billboard paper, posters, newsprint. Bradford has built a body of work that is richly layered in both material and meaning. The MacArthur Award-winning artist’s seductive works reinvigorate abstraction with social awareness: often resembling aerial views, they subtly map the patterns of class, race, gender, and sexuality that structure American life, especially life in Bradford’s own South Central Los Angeles neighborhood. 
If you’re in the bay, definitely check out the show - and make sure you check out my favorite piece from the show - “Paris is Burning”.

thegang:

Artist Mark Bradford is currently showing his work in an awesome show at theSFMOMA.

Bradford is an abstract artist who crafts abstract paintings from fragments of the urban environment — permanent-wave end papers (beauty parlor realness!), billboard paper, posters, newsprint. Bradford has built a body of work that is richly layered in both material and meaning. The MacArthur Award-winning artist’s seductive works reinvigorate abstraction with social awareness: often resembling aerial views, they subtly map the patterns of class, race, gender, and sexuality that structure American life, especially life in Bradford’s own South Central Los Angeles neighborhood. 

If you’re in the bay, definitely check out the show - and make sure you check out my favorite piece from the show - “Paris is Burning”.

Iced words

sfmoma:

SUBMISSION:

iced words, already beginning to melt.. the words can slowly fade away..Kotama Bouabane / Inzoom art photography 


This December, in a surprisingly simple yet ridiculously amazing installation for theQueensland Gallery of Modern Ar, artist Yayoi Kusama constructed a large domestic environment, painting every wall, chair, table, piano, and household decoration a brilliant white, effectively serving as a giant white canvas. Over the course of two weeks, the museum’s smallest visitors were given thousands upon thousands of colored dot stickers and were invited to collaborate in the transformation of the space, turning the house into a vibrantly mottled explosion of color. The installation, entitled The Obliteration Room, is part of Kusama’s Look Now, See Forever exhibition.

For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter. See more of Aiba’s work here

awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Donald Glover and Aubrey Plaza

awesomepeoplehangingouttogether:

Donald Glover and Aubrey Plaza

Sesame Street: OK Go - Three Primary Colors (by SesameStreet)